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Scientology Myths - what is fact? what is fiction?

Engram

engram: a memory recording of an experience containing pain, unconsciousness and a real or fancied threat to survival. It is a recording in the reactive mind of something which actually happened to an individual in the past and which contained pain and unconsciousness, both of which are recorded in the mental image picture called an engram. It must, by definition, have impact or injury as part of its content. These engrams are a complete recording, down to the last accurate detail, of every perception present in a moment of partial or full unconsciousness.

reactive mind: that portion of a person’s mind which works on a totally stimulus-response basis, which is not under his control and which exerts force and the power of command over his awareness, purposes, thoughts, body and actions. The reactive mind is where engrams are stored.

mind: a control system between the person and the outside world. The mind is not a brain but stores memories, ideas, things that happened to the person and is available to him or her to solve problems. A part of the mind is not under the control and below the conscience of the person: the reactive mind. Here is where engrams are stored. Auditing gets the person to remember these engrams again and with that their harmful influence on the person is canceled. The engram then can be remembered just as anything else in the analytical mind.

analytical mind: the conscious, aware mind which thinks, observes data, remembers it and resolves problems. It would be essentially the conscious mind as opposed to the unconscious mind. In Dianetics and Scientology the analytical mind is the one which is alert and aware and the reactive mind simply reacts without analysis.

stimulus-response: the principle that given a certain stimulus (anything that can be perceived), something will automatically give a certain response. For example if someone "automatically" reacts exasperated when seeing a dog, that is a stimulus-response.